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Professor Roman selected to receive Haywood Burns/Shanara Gilbert Award

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Professor Roman selected to receive Haywood Burns/Shanara Gilbert Award

Professor Ediberto Roman has been selected to receive the Haywood Burns / Shanara Gilbert Award at the 2013 Northeast People of Color Conference. This award recognizes professors and activists who “have demonstrated a sustained commitment to the advancement of the legal, social, and economic position of People of Color in our society”. To read more about the award click here.

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Professor Fingerhut represents Whistleblower in Baseball Steroid Scandal

Professor Gabilondo’s essay on Miami appears in Cuba’s Temas

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Professor Gabilondo’s essay on Miami appears in Cuba’s Temas

Professor Jose Gabilondo was  one of five academics from FIU invited to write for a special issue on Cubans in Miami put out in June by Catalejo, the blog operated by Temas.  Published in Havana, Catalejo and Temas are prominent fora for debates among Cuban and Cuban-American academics and intellectuals about culture, ideology, and society. His essay – Miami – entre lo crudo y lo cocido´´ (´Miami – between the raw and the cooked´) examines the different ways in which Cubans react to nativism and ethnic backlash in Miami.

‘Sometimes it seems that Miami is still fighting the Cold War, so it’s exciting and encouraging to be part of expanding intellectual exchange with colleagues on  the island.’

The entire issue can be found here

 

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Prof. Foley Op-Ed Published in New York Post

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Professor Elizabeth Price Foley was recently published in the New York Post discussing the New York City’s “Stop-and-Frisk” policy. Read Op-Ed

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Prof. M.C. Mirow Published in Washington University Global Studies Law Review

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Professor M.C. Mirow has published an article, Pre-Constitutional Law and Constitutions: Spanish Colonial Law and the Constitution of Cádiz, 12 Washington University Global Studies Law Review 313-337 (2013).   The work studies the different ways that laws in existence at the time of drafting constitutions are used in the constitutional process and in the constitutional text itself.  The study makes particular use of derecho indiano, the Spanish colonial law applied in the Americas, as it provided a common base of legal knowledge about the Americas, a ready source for answers to specific legal questions, and a rhetorical tool in justifying the historical validity of the Spanish Constitution of 1812.  This constitution was the first constitution to govern the territory now known as Florida, and last year Mirow published a translation and commentary on it entitled Florida’s First Constitution, the Constitution of Cádiz.

Read Full Article

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Professors Markham and Pouncy cited by Federal District Court in Bloomberg L.P. v. Commodity

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Professors Jerry Markham and Charles Pouncy were both recently cited by the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia in Bloomberg L.P. V. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, — F.Supp.2d —-, 2013 WL 2458283 (D.D.C.) [Civil Action No. 13–523(BAH) (June 7, 2013)] in a case involving the CFTC’s ability to regulate the clearing of certain derivative trades (financial swaps).

Read More

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Prof. Gomez publishes article on $18.2 Billion Judgement against Chevron in Latin America

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Professor Manuel Gomez’s latest article on the enforcement of the $18.2 billion judgment against Chevron in Latin America has caught the attention of several prominent blogs such as Lawrence Solum’s Legal Theory Blog, conflictsoflaws.net, and Letters Blogatory, which named it “Paper of the Day” in its August 23rd edition. The article titled “The Global Chase: Seeking the Recognition and Enforcement of the Lago Agrio Judgment Outside of Ecuador”, which is currently available on SSRN, is scheduled to appear in the next issue of the Stanford Journal of Complex Litigation.

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Prof. Gomez interviewed about the launch of VENAMBAR, the Venezuelan American National Bar Association

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On Thursday August 22, 2013 a group of Miami-based attorneys launched the Venezuelan American National Bar Association (VENAMBAR). The reception, which attracted more than 150 attendees and featured Honorable Judge Federico Moreno as a keynote speaker marked a promising beginning for the organization. The main goal of VENAMBAR is to connect Venezuelan-American lawyers with each other, with in house counsel, and to liaise with lawyers and members of the business community both in Venezuela and the United States. Professor Manuel Gomez is one the founders of VENAMBAR and is also a member of its Foreign Attorneys Committee. Professor Gomez was featured in an interview about the organization in a recent edition of the Daily Business Review and the South Florida Business Journal.

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Cyberspace Law: Edited Book by Professor Travis Adopted for Teaching Law at FIU and Howard University

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Cyberspace Law: Edited Book by Professor Travis Adopted for Teaching Law at FIU and Howard University

A new book edited by Hannibal Travis of the FIU College of Law faculty offers in-depth commentary on the transition of the Internet from a freewheeling space to a more restricted medium.  The American Civil Liberties Union calls the filtered Internet the third age of cyberspace.  Filtering involves the flagging and taking down of material alleged to violate the law or policies of an Internet intermediary such as Google.  It is an increasingly automated process that may be insensitive to distinctions drawn by the Constitution or other laws.

Internet companies often define their missions as making the world’s knowledge available to everyone with access to the World Wide Web, and organizing content for easier accessibility.  Internet filters threaten to censor expressive commentaries, slow the growth of innovative companies, and change the nature of Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other popular Internet services. While limiting indecent, offensive, or illegal content, filters will sweep more broadly.

Professor Travis, working with a variety of leading theorists of Internet regulation and a practitioner of cyberspace law from Silicon Valley, has released a book analyzing leading Internet law cases, entitled Cyberspace Law: Censorship and Regulation of the Internet. The book is being published by Routledge, a global publisher of academic books and journals.

Chapters by Professor Travis provide an overview of key points in the regulation of cyberspace, including the ongoing struggle between the Federal Communications Commission and Internet infrastructure owners over net neutrality, the failed effort by the federal government to force “indecent” content behind credit-card filters that verified users’ ages, and initiatives by the Federal Trade Commission and private parties to improve privacy on Facebook.  Contributions by Margreth Barrett of the University of California, Johanna K.P. Dennis of the University of Vermont, and Jasmine Abdel-Malik of the University of Missouri describe threats to cyberspace freedom posed by new forms of patent and trademark enforcement.  Claims that search engines, e-commerce sites, and basic Web services encourage users to violate intellectual property rights could reshape the way that Internet users are allowed to exercise their digital freedoms.  Methods of accessing knowledge on Google and YouTube, for example, may trigger harsh copyright liability, and confront courts with new questions about whether to impose filters on how videos may be shared, or how books are made searchable.  Lateef Mtima of Howard University and Amir Hassanabadi of Fenwick & West share insights from their deep research into the courts’ resolution of lawsuits seeking to impose billions of dollars’ worth of copyright liability on digital libraries and video sites.  Finally, the culpability of Internet service providers for offensive material that their services make available online is an issue that illuminates a potential conflict between U.S. and European approaches to Internet content, a conflict that is particularly acute in cases of implicit threats by means of incitement or celebration of mass violence.  Ann Bartow and Raphael Cohen-Almagor provide rich accounts of cyberlaw’s responsibility problem.

Plans are underway to assign chapters of the book in the copyright law curriculum at FIU, and the cyberspace law curriculum at Howard University.

Table of Contents

1. Claiming web addresses as property / Margreth Barrett

2. The promise of information justice / Lateef Mtima

3. Owning methods of conducting business in cyberspace / Johanna K.P. Dennis

4. Red flags of “piracy” online / Amir Hassanabadi

5. Who controls the Internet? : The second circuit on YouTube / Hannibal Travis

6. Is eBay counterfeiting? / Jasmine Abdel-Khalik

7. Bad samaritanism: Barnes v. Yahoo and Section 230 ISP immunity / Ann Bartow

8. Internet responsibility, geographic boundaries, and business ethics / Raphael Cohen-Almagor

9. Neutralizing the open Internet / Hannibal Travis

10. The “monster” that ate social networking? / Hannibal Travis

11. Conclusion: taking it down / Hannibal Travis

 

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Prof. Charles Jalloh Interviewed on Voice of America TV on Kenya’s Parliamentary Vote to Withdraw from the International Criminal Court

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Prof. Charles Jalloh Interviewed on Voice of America TV on Kenya’s Parliamentary Vote to Withdraw from the International Criminal Court

On September 6, 2013, Charles C. Jalloh, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, was the invited expert on the Africa 54 program hosted by Vincent Makori for Voice of America TV in Washington. He discussed the implications of Kenya’s parliamentary vote last week urging the government to withdraw the influential East African nation from the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC). He explained that, contrary to what Kenyan politicians have been leading their people to believe, withdrawal from the treaty that has so far been endorsed by 122 countries (including 34 African States) will not affect the ICC’s pending crimes against humanity prosecutions of President Uhuru Kenyatta and Vice-President William Ruto. The United States under President Bill Clinton signed, but has not yet become, a party to the ICC treaty. In Professor Jalloh’s view, this latest attempt to politicize the work that the ICC is carrying out on behalf of over 1,300 innocent Kenyans killed in the 2007-2008 post-election violence is a step backward in the fight against impunity in Africa.

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International Opportunities Lunch & Learn for Law Students

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International Opportunities Lunch & Learn for Law Students

On Thursday, September 5 the Office of International and Graduate Studies organized a Lunch & Learn with Dr. Hilarion “Lari” Martinez, FIU’s Senior International Officer, to discuss various international opportunities available to law students.  Students became aware of the numerous scholarships, fellowships, and internships, many fully-funded by the federal government, offered on a national scale.  FIU and the College of Law are proud to boast its success in its many students who are awarded such scholarships annually in these competitive programs.  If you were not able to attend the event and would like to learn about these exciting opportunities, you may view the presentation at this link.

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Prof. Fingerhut to host Tuesday Times Roundtable on Lessons Learned from Zimmerman Trial

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Prof. Fingerhut to host Tuesday Times Roundtable on Lessons Learned from Zimmerman Trial

Prof. H. Scott Fingerhut will host Almost Just: Lessons Learned from the Zimmerman Trial on Tuesday, Sept. 10th at 12:30 in the Graham Center, Room 150. Free lunch will be provided, no RSVP required.

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Charles Jalloh Publishes Op Ed on JURIST

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Charles Jalloh Publishes Op Ed on JURIST

On September, 13, 2013, Charles C. Jalloh, Visiting Associate Professor, published an op ed on JURIST explaining the legal reasons why Kenya’s parliamentary motion urging the country to withdraw from the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court poses major risks for little gain. Read it here.

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FIU College of Law and Univision host a phone bank to help residents obtain their citizenship.

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FIU College of Law and Univision host a phone bank to help residents obtain their citizenship.

This past Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013, Florida International University’s College of Law  joined forces with Univision station WLTV, local channel 23, to host a phone bank in support of the National Citizenship Day campaign “Ya es Hora…Ciudadania.”

The volunteers, comprised of members from the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO), Catholic Charities, Hispanic Unity, Read2Succeed, National Council of La Raza (NCLR), and FIU law students advised hundreds of callers on the on application process, and invited them to join clinical workshops on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 being held in locations in Miami-Dade and Broward, including at FIU Law in Rafael Diaz Balart Hall’s Founding Dean Leonard P. Strickman Atrium.

 

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Prof. Charles Jalloh Speaks at Penn Law School

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Prof. Charles Jalloh Speaks at Penn Law School

On September 20, 2013, Charles C. Jalloh, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, spoke on two separate panels at the University of Pennsylvania Law School interdisciplinary conference on the Future of International Criminal Law in Africa. Read more about the conference here.

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Professor Fairlie on Miranda and Its International Counterparts

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Professor Megan Fairlie’s upcoming article, Miranda and its (More Rights-Protective) International Counterparts (20 UC Davis Journal of International Law & Policy (2013, Forthcoming)) was recently featured on CrimProf blog.

The full text of Professor Fairlie’s article can be accessed here.

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George Knox recognized as a living legend during ICABA Honors gala

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On Saturday, November 2, 2012, the ICABA Media Group, LLC hosted its 4th Annual ICABA Honors gala which identifies some of South Florida’s most influential and accomplished African Americans. Among the evening’s honorees, was FIU College of Law faculty member and Director of Non Litigation Advocacy programs – George Knox who was honored with the Living Legends award.

“I am humbled by the recognition.  Usually the word legend suggests you’re done; you’ve done all you’re going to do.  Frankly, I believe I still have a lot more to do,” said Knox.  ”To be selected by a prestigious company like ICABA is quite an honor.”

ICABA Media Group is a social media company integrating print and digital publications with signature events to profile and connect accomplished black professionals and entrepreneurs.

 

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FIU College of Law recognized for giving back

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FIU College of Law recognized for giving back

FIU College of Law was presented with the Statute of Liberty Centennial serigraph signed by its artist, Melanie Taylor Kent, as part of the Aventura Marketing Council’s Second Annual Art from the Heart program, which recognizes non-profit organizations and institutions who give back to the community. The artwork was donated by Barker Animation Fine Art & Sculptures. FIU College of Law received the artwork in honor of its Math & Civics Summer Academy – a program spearheaded by Senior Associate Dean Michelle Mason.

Now in its third year, the program, which partners FIU’s Colleges of Law and Education, along with the Algebra Project (AP), and the Young People’s Project (YPP), designed and implemented as the only Math & Civics summer academy in the nation. During the last three summers, students in third through fifth grade, who attend Liberty City elementary schools, spent their days at the College of Law where YPP students and former Miami AP cohort graduates, who presently are college students at various institutions, focused on teaching mathematics, and College of Law interns who focused on teaching civics.

“The College of Law is delighted to receive this beautiful artwork as a reminder of the importance and value of work we do with our summer academy students,” stated Senior Associate Dean Mason. “We hope to add more students next year!”

The Math & Civics Summer Academy program was nominated by Aventura Commissioner, Enbar Cohen, who is currently a first year law student at FIU College of Law.

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The “Amparization” of the Justice System in Latin America and International Arbitration by Professor Manuel A. Gómez

Professor J. OseiTutu at MSU College of Law

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Professor J. OseiTutu presented her work in progress at the Michigan State University College of Law Junior Faculty Workshop. Professor OseiTutu’s current research project is about the relationship between intellectual property law and human rights law.

 

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